Our Rights, for which many people had died in the Atlantic-Charter, the UN-Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights! We – every citizen of each country of the world – have the rights of its implementation!

Here the fundament in political decisions, which brought the world together, to win against the German effort to conquer the whole world and exploit ressources and people around the globe for an elite of the “Arier” the German ethnicitym how Hitlers party described them! These fundaments made the victory against Germany possible, but the promises were not kept to those who fought the war.

Soldiers of the colonies fought against Germany, because in the Atlantik-Chartet the US-President Roosevelt forced the President of the Britisch-Emire, who still had occupied and was exploting large parts of the world, to exept the selfdetermination of people. First time the industrilised states, which had conquered big parts of the world in this document acepted, that they have no rigt, to do so:

Four of the eight principal points of the Charter, which we refer mainly to  were:

Printed copy of Atlantic Charter distributed as propaganda

  1. (..)
  2. all people had a right to self-determination;
  3. there was to be global economic cooperation and advancement of social welfare;
  4. the participants would work for a world free of want and fear;
  5.  and a post-war common disarmament.
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Charter
  7. The Charter had a base on national level in the US. President Roosvelt tried to convince the Americans, who did not want to participate in the war with the promise to develope an Ameerica and a world with these four freedoms for all:

FDR 1944 Color Portrait.tif

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (/ˈrzəvəlt/, his own pronunciation,[2] or /ˈrzəvɛlt/; January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the President of the United States from 1933 to 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and dominated his party for many years as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war. His program for relief, recovery and reform, known as the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the role of the federal government in the economy. As a dominant leader of the Democratic Party, he built the New Deal Coalition that brought together and united labor unions, big city machines, white ethnics, African Americans, and rural white Southerners in support of the party.

  1. The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on January 6, 1941. In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people “everywhere in the world” ought to enjoy:
    1. Freedom of speech
    2. Freedom of worship
    3. Freedom from want
    4. Freedom from fear
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Freedoms

Even more clear was the US-Vice-President at this time, Henry Wallace:

Head and shoulders of man about fifty with upswept hair, wearing a gray suit and dark tie

The Century of the Common Man

Men and women can not be really free until they have plenty to eat, and time and ability to read and think and talk things over. Down the years, the people of the United States have moved steadily forward in the practice of democracy. Through universal education, they now can read and write and form opinions of their own. They have learned, and are still learning, the art of production — that is, how to make a living. They have learned, and are still learning, the art of self-government.

If we were to measure freedom by standards of nutrition, education and self-government, we might rank the United States and certain nations of Western Europe very high. But this would not be fair to other nations where education had become widespread only in the last twenty years. In many nations, a generation ago, nine out of ten of the people could not read or write. Russia, for example, was changed from an illiterate to a literate nation within one generation and, in the process, Russia’s appreciation of freedom was enormously enhanced. In China, the increase during the past thirty years in the ability of the people to read and write has been matched by their increased interest in real liberty.

Everywhere, reading and writing are accompanied by industrial progress sooner or later inevitably brings a strong labor movement. From a long-time and fundamental point of view, there are no backward peoples which are lacking in mechanical sense. Russians, Chinese, and the Indians both of India and the Americas all learn to read and write and operate machines just as well as your children and my children. Everywhere the common people are on the march. Thousands of them are learning to read and write, learning to think together, learning to use tools. These people are learning to think and work together in labor movements, some of which may be extreme or impractical at first, but which eventually will settle down to serve effectively the interests of the common man.

The march of freedom of the past one hundred and fifty years has been a long-drawn-out people’s revolution. In this Great Revolution of the people, there were the American Revolution of 1775, The French Revolution of 1792, The Latin-American revolutions of the Bolivarian era, The German Revolution of 1848, and the Russian Revolution of 1917. Each spoke for the common man in terms of blood on the battlefield. Some went to excess. But the significant thing is that the people groped their way to the light. More of them learned to think and work together.
The people, in their millennial and revolutionary march toward manifesting here on earth the dignity that is in every human soul, hold as their credo the Four Freedoms enunciated by President Roosevelt in his message to Congress on January 6, 1941. These four freedoms are the very core of the revolution for which the United Nations have taken their stand. We who live in the United States may think there is nothing very revolutionary about freedom of religion, freedom of expression, and freedom from the fear of secret police. But when we begin to think about the significance of freedom from want for the average man, then we know that the revolution of the past one hundred and fifty years has not been completed, either here in the United States or in any other nation in the world. We know that this revolution can not stop until freedom from want has actually been attained.

Modern science, which is a by-product and an essential part of the people’s revolution, has made it technologically possible to see that all of the people of the world get enough to eat. Half in fun and half seriously, I said the other day to Madame Litvinov: “The object of this war is to make sure that everybody in the world has the privilege of drinking a quart of milk a day.” She replied: “Yes, even half a pint.” The peace must mean a better standard of living for the common man, not merely in the United States and England, but also in India, Russia, China and Latin America — not merely in the United Nations, but also in Germany and Italy and Japan.

Some have spoken of the “American Century.” I say that the century on which we are entering — The century which will come out of this war — can be and must be the century of the common man. Perhaps it will be America’s opportunity to suggest that Freedoms and duties by which the common man must live. Everywhere the common man must learn to build his own industries with his own hands is a practical fashion. Everywhere the common man must learn to increase his productivity so that he and his children can eventually pay to the world community all that they have received. No nation will have the God-given right to exploit other nations. Older nations will have the privilege to help younger nations get started on the path to industrialization, but there must be neither military nor economic imperialism. The methods of the nineteenth century will not work in the people’s century which is now about to begin. India, China, and Latin America have a tremendous stake in the people’s century. As their masses learn to read and write, and as they become productive mechanics, their standard of living will double and treble. Modern science, when devoted whole-heartedly to the general welfare, has in it potentialities of which we do not yet dream.

Yes, and when the time of peace comes, The citizen will again have a duty, The supreme duty of sacrificing the lesser interest for the greater interest of the general welfare. Those who write the peace must think of the whole world. There can be no privileged peoples. We ourselves in the United States are no more a master race than the Nazis. And we can not perpetuate economic warfare without planting the seeds of military warfare. We must use our power at the peace table to build an economic peace that is just, charitable and enduring. (….) 

all: http://www1.american.edu/epiphany/CCM.htm

Many Africans were mobilzed for these goals and fought in the British and French Army against Germany!

World map of colonization at the end of the Second World War in 1945

In 1945 50 states the UN-Charter in the sense of the Atlantik-Charter, here the präambel, which we refer to:

“WE THE PEOPLES OF THE UNITED NATIONS DETERMINED

  • to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice in our lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind, and
  • to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and
  • to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and
  • to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

AND FOR THESE ENDS

  • to practice tolerance and live together in peace with one another as good neighbours, and
  • to unite our strength to maintain international peace and security, and
  • to ensure, by the acceptance of principles and the institution of methods, that armed force shall not be used, save in the common interest, and
  • to employ international machinery for the promotion of the economic and social advancement of all peoples,

HAVE RESOLVED TO COMBINE OUR EFFORTS TO ACCOMPLISH THESE AIMS

Accordingly, our respective Governments, through representatives assembled in the city of San Francisco, who have exhibited their full powers found to be in good and due form, have agreed to the present Charter of the United Nations and do hereby establish an international organization to be known as the United Nations.

more, especially chapter 1+2, you find here:

http://www.un.org/en/sections/un-charter/preamble/index.html

But after Germany was beaten and even after signing this UN-Charter the colonialpowers France and Britain did not keep their promises of the Atlantik-Charter and the UN-Charter and did not give selfdetermination to their colonies. Very brutally they repressed demonstrations for self-independence, sometimes with massacers.

A demonstration for the Independence for the French Colony Algeria answered France with The Setif Massacre
Algerian Genocide: The Setif Massacre

On 8 May 1945, French army troops with machines guns opened fire on a crowd, killing hundreds of people.

http://www.worldbulletin.net/filebox/139653/algerian-genocide-the-setif-massacre

similar actions – even wars – took part in many parts of the colonial world: The Colonisers used all kind of repression, violence and wars, to hinder the selfdetermination of their colonies, all against the sense of the UN-Charter.

Only when they were militarily beaten, they were ready to leave, but tried in a new hidden system of Ne-Colonialism to keep their domination of their former colonies, even after independence, the first Ghanian President, Kwame Nkrume described it in his book about Neo-Colonialism.

The United Nation as an independent body as a poer above the states was by the big powers weakened, where they could.

But in 1948 they were forced by action of people and by the public opinion to pass through goals in the spirit of the Atlantik-Charter and the UN-Charter.

The Declaration was commissioned in 1946 and was drafted over two years by the Commission on Human Rights. The Commission consisted of 18 members from various nationalities and political backgrounds. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights Drafting Committee was chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt, who was known for her human rights advocacy.

Canadian John Peters Humphrey was called upon by the United Nations Secretary-General to work on the project and became the Declaration’s principal drafter

EleanorRooseveltHumanRights.png

The British government did all, that this declaration should only be an appeal, but Eleonor Roosevelt made it clear before the voting, it is a global constitution:

http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

 

Here the preambel, in which the spirit of the declaration ist clearified and some general chapters, but all articles are very important:

Preamble

Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,

Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,

Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,

Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,

Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Article 1.All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2.
Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national o social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty. (that means also all people in the at time still colonised countries hat even these rights)

Article 3. Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

(..)

Article 21. (1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
(2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

(..)
Article 28. Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29. (1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.

(…)